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Mic Placement for Voice & Flutes.

Regardless of what style of recording you will be doing, if you fail to meet these simple requirements, YOU WILL MOST LIKELY FAIL! Recording audio is easy if you just follow a few rules. If you skip them, then your audio will suffer.
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Dana
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Mic Placement for Voice & Flutes.

Post: # 10Post Dana
Wed Mar 28, 2018 3:31 am

I am not a musician but I do play around with the drums and bass. I follow this guy on YT called CaneMajor. He is a flutist. Well, really he is a master of flutes. He made a great video showing how mic placement can effect your voice as well as your flute. This is a short video and is well worth watching.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-vzy6aLAGw


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thestorygirl
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Post: # 282Post thestorygirl
Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:09 pm

Hi, Dana,
I'm playing around today and watching a lot of videos on mic placement. One thing I don't understand, when I hear that the mic should be at an angle from my face, I was assuming that meant to the left of my face. But should it actually be in front, only tilted exactly like eating an ice cream cone? Thanks. :)

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Dana
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Location: Virginia
Operating System: Windows 8 & 10.
Digital Audio Workstation (DAW): Reaper, Hindenburg, Audacity.
Mics: Shure SM7b, SM 57 & 58, ATR 2100, AKG P120, AT Pro 70.
Digital Recorder: Tascam DR-40, Zoom H6.
Contact:
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Post: # 283Post Dana
Tue Oct 16, 2018 3:33 am

I don't know about the ice cream cone theory. I eat mine in two gulps. MMMMMMMMMMMMMM, ice cream! :happy-partydance: When it comes to narration, you first must decide where you will be reading your script from. Most people will be reading it off of a computer, that requires them to look slightly down. The best case is to have your monitor placed so that it is at eye level. This will help keep your throat open and will put less strain on your vocal cords, or so they say.

So, once you figure that out, place the mic directly in front of your mouth. Now, move the head of the mic to the left or right about 1 inch. Now, move the head of the mic up or down 1 inch. Myself, I move my mic to the right and up. All you are trying to do is to keep from speaking directly into the mic. This will help reduce the plosives and will also help with breathing noises. This works better with dynamic mics and it is a must when using condensers. That is why you always see most news shows using lavaliere mics. If you really pay attention to them, very seldom do they sound bad and you never hear your TV speakers "pop".

Notice in the pic below how the mic is lower then the narrators mouth and he is looking straight forward.


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