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Desirable RMS AND PEAK LEVELS FOR FINAL OUTPUT

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:36 pm
by wuhan87
Hello!

I've read that the difference between the RMS level or average volume level and the peaks in an audio track is a good determination of the amount of dynamics in the track. According to which kind of project your working on and what it will be used for, I realize that these may differ. I've read for TV commercials especially, heavy compression is used so that the final mix can be pushed up to maximum amplitude. I am curious to know for each of the following, what would be your desirable final RMS and peak values and why? I am still trying to understand this a little more.
commercial on the web:
commercial on TV:
film narration on the web:
film narration on TV:
web animation:
e-learning/coporate videos:

Re: Desirable RMS AND PEAK LEVELS FOR FINAL OUTPUT

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:17 pm
by Dana
Hello and welcome. The answer may depend on which country you may live in. When you ask:

I've read for TV commercials especially, heavy compression is used so that the final mix can be pushed up to maximum amplitude. I am curious to know for each of the following, what would be your desirable final RMS and peak values and why? I am still trying to understand this a little more.
commercial on the web:
commercial on TV:
film narration on the web:
film narration on TV:
web animation:
e-learning/coporate videos:
In the USA, we/I go by the AES. (Audio Engineering Society). They recommend that all streaming audio be between a -16 and -20LUFS. (Loudness Units Full Scale). They also recommend a Total Peak of a -1dbs. Their loudness range is a 4dbs. This simply means that from the softest to the loudest part of your audio, it does not fluctuate more then 4dbs.

As far as TV goes, this was established by the CALM Act and the AES again, set the rules for this as well. All cable companies must follow these guidelines but many do not. These rules were set as too many people were complaining about the volume levels that were set by the programs they were watching, as they were much lower than the commercials. So when the commercials came on, the jump in the volume level would scare them or they would have to race to lower the volume and then raise it again, when their show came back on. You can view the AES guidelines for streaming TV here.