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Exploring audiobook narration

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River
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Exploring audiobook narration

Post: # 192Post River
Tue Aug 21, 2018 4:04 pm

Good afternoon! I came across your site and work, Dana, when searching the Recording Revolution VIP forum for anyone experienced with recording the spoken word. I'm trying to capture music but I also really enjoy reading out loud to my family and have been told by others that I can read well. I've had the idea to try my hand at recording a short public domain children's story and selling as a cheap download. Just to try. Your site informed me about ACX, which I had never heard of. Very interesting! If I had the set-up I would definitely audition once my current project is done.

The obstacles I need to overcome are 1) set-up: identifying some way to record without capturing the highway traffic by my house and 2) reducing unwanted mouth noises.

I'll also mention my husband just started recording a podcast for a local business. By podcast standards it is fine but he's interested in some tips as well. We live in the eastern panhandle of WV.

So here I am and there you are. I haven't looked through much else on this forum but please point me in the right direction. Thanks!



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Dana
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Post: # 193Post Dana
Tue Aug 21, 2018 6:48 pm

Good afternoon and welcome! I used to live in between Beckley and Whitesville from 1973 to 1979 in a little town called Arnett.

The best way to reduce unwanted background noise is to use a dynamic mic. The ATR2100 is a great starter mic and it is also used by many Podcasters. As far as the mouth noises and plosives, the best thing to do is be hydrated and stay away from caffeine before you start to record. The ACX requires a -60db max noise floor. Most people will have a hard time meeting this if they use a condenser mic. One of the ways around this is to have a very quite recording area. Condensers are really made for studio work.

I also use a product that you can buy over the counter for dry mouth. This stuff works great. Just google mouthwash for dry mouth and you will get several options. Tell your husband that he can list his Podcast on my site if he wants. I also run a website called Your Podcast Review as well. I have analyzed over 10,000 podcast for the ones that want to be within the AES recommended standards, for streaming audio. Again, thanks for signing up and welcome to the community. p.s. What is the name of the podcast!

hello
Mixing & Mastering is Simple WHEN Your Recording Is Within The Specs! RECORD PROPERLY & MASTER LIGHTLY

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Post: # 194Post Liz
Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:15 am

Hello and Welcome! Glad to see you here.

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River
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Post: # 196Post River
Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:49 pm

That is interesting about dynamic mics. Would a Shure SM58 be an improvement on the ATR2100? (I'm guessing yes.) What about those wireless lapel mics that preachers often use? I'm not in a rush but in the next few months I will be deciding what to invest in next. I've been using a borrowed pair of large diaphragm condenser mics (for capturing piano and voice) in addition to the Zoom H4n. One thing I'll need to gauge is how much I should record myself and how much I should enlist the services or space of others.

EDIT...I see you have some more mic explanations in other parts of the forum...am reading now.

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Dana
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Digital Recorder: Tascam DR-40, Zoom H6.
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Post: # 197Post Dana
Sun Aug 26, 2018 11:55 pm

River wrote:
Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:49 pm
That is interesting about dynamic mics. Would a Shure SM58 be an improvement on the ATR2100? (I'm guessing yes.)
The Shure 57 and 58 are the same mic except that the 57 has a smaller head. These mics are built like a tank. If you ever watch the President speak, you will always see a 58 on his podium. The 2100 is a great starter mic and they used to be around $57.00, but now they are up around $79.00. There really is no comparison between the two mics as Shure has really built the best mouse trap. Shure has not changed the design of these two mics since the mid 1960s.

I have a Shure 7b that mostly sits in my mic locker. I only bring it out for vocals. For $99.00, the 57 or 58 just can not be beat. It's funny as I get a lot of emails stating that the 57 and 58 has very low input signals, but people do not understand that these mics need to be between 2 or 3 inches away from the sound source. The closer the mic to the sound source, the less background noise/room tone you have, and the more mic presence you gain. These two mics built rock and roll back in the 60s and 70s and are still widely used in studios today.
What about those wireless lapel mics that preachers often use? I'm not in a rush but in the next few months I will be deciding what to invest in next.
I had a set of 6 of them and gave them away. They were condensers and picked up everything from cb radios to air plane pilots. If you are going to invest, make sure you get the higher end sets as the cheaper models work great in Church, but not so well for professional recording.
I've been using a borrowed pair of large diaphragm condenser mics (for capturing piano and voice) in addition to the Zoom H4n. One thing I'll need to gauge is how much I should record myself and how much I should enlist the services or space of others.
If you are going to be recording interviews, you need to set up both or how every many mics you will be using to a -12 to -18dbs for your input. If you are using dynamic mics you can set 3 or 4 feet apart and have very little mic bleed between them. It is almost impossible to do this with condenser mics. Mic bleed adds an artificial reverb into the mix that is very time consuming to remove and in some situations, it is impossible. Most studios, including myself, will always run a set of "room mics". These are condensers, but they have their own tracks. When it comes time to do the mixing, you simply add a little bit of these tracks, to the main tracks and it makes a world of difference.

Think about your situation. If you record the keys using the LDC on one track and had a set of room mics set to their own tracks, when you mixed it down, you would use the LDC, (Large Diaphragm Condenser) for most of the signal and blend in the other two room mic track to get the final output volume level. It makes you audio sound much fuller. (thicker).
EDIT...I see you have some more mic explanations in other parts of the forum...am reading now.
If you have any questions, just ask them in the mic forum. You can check out this vid I did concerning mic bleed and how sensitive condenser mics are. Have a great nite! Dana.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ivNWq7BCd8
Mixing & Mastering is Simple WHEN Your Recording Is Within The Specs! RECORD PROPERLY & MASTER LIGHTLY

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thestorygirl
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Post: # 226Post thestorygirl
Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:01 pm

Hi, there! Have you considered volunteer-reading on Librivox.org? It's a great place to get practice, and there are lots of children's projects to work on. (Just don't pick up any bad recording habits there! Dana will help you see the :idea: )

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River
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Post: # 227Post River
Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:31 pm

Hi! Yes, but it is already so well supplied that I would rather do recorded projects distributed through other means.

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thestorygirl
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Post: # 228Post thestorygirl
Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:57 pm

8-)

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